Monthly Archives: April 2016

Florida Regulators Approve Policy Language Aimed at Limiting “Assignments of Benefits” Claim Practice

Insurance companies that write property risks in Florida are getting in line to request approval from the Office of Insurance Regulation (OIR) for two key policy revisions intended to control losses from a water damage property claim practice called “assignment of benefits.” Many insurers have attributed the rising costs of water claims in Florida to an increase in the use of assignments of benefits (AOBs).  This practice occurs primarily in the residential homeowners’ context and involves a situation where, following a water damage event, the insured assigns its rights and benefits under its insurance policy to a third-party contractor or water mitigation company.  The water remediation contractor then bills the insurance company directly with rates that often substantially exceed the

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Reservation of Rights Letters Help Avoid Prejudice in the Third Party Context

When discussing bad faith in the third party context, most of the discussion properly centers on the duty to settle a claim.  However, other actions taken by a policyholder and carrier can have an impact.  The recent case of State Farm v. El-Moslimany provides a good example.  In El-Moslimany, State Farm found itself defending its policyholder from a defamation claim.  After defending for two years, State Farm filed a declaratory action, contending that the defamation claim at issue was not covered by its policy.  A year after filing the declaratory judgment action, State Farm filed a motion for summary judgment.  The policyholder responded, in part, claiming that State Farm’s attempt to withdraw from its defense obligation was “bad faith.”  The

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Florida High Court – UM Insured Entitled to Liability/Damages Determination Before Filing Bad Faith Action

Petitioner Adrian Fridman (“Fridman”) was injured in an automobile accident involving an underinsured motorist. Fridman filed a claim with his uninsured/underinsured (UM) insurance carrier (Insurer) for the $50,000 limits of his UM policy.  After the Insurer refused to pay the policy limits, Fridman filed a complaint against the Insurer to determine liability under the UM policy and the full extent of his damages.  One month before trial, the Insurer tendered a check to Fridman for $50,000 and filed a confession of judgment for that amount seeking entry of the confessed judgment and a dismissal.  Fridman opposed the entry of a confessed judgment, arguing that a jury verdict would determine the upper limits of Insurer’s potential liability under a future bad

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Posted in Bad Faith
Avoiding Insurance Bad Faith
Cozen O’Connor represents insurance clients in jurisdictions throughout the U.S. against statutory and common law first- and third-party extracontractual claims for actual and consequential damages, penalties, punitive and exemplary damages, attorneys’ fees and costs, and coverage payments. Whether bad faith claims are addenda to a broader coverage matter or are central to the complaint, Cozen O’Connor attorneys know how to efficiently respond to extracontractual causes of action. More
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