Monthly Archives: May 2016

The Duty to Follow-up: How A $25,000 Offer To Settle Turns Into A $7 Million Loss

In many states, an insurer not only has a duty to timely communicate with its insured and respond to demands for settlement by a claimant asserting a claim regarding the adjustment of a loss, that duty may also include the duty to follow-up on those communications.  As a recent case decided by the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois shows, the costs of not doing so, even on a relatively small claim under a low limit policy, can be catastrophic. Horace Mann Insurance Company provided automotive insurance limits of $25,000.  Less than 45 days after a motor vehicle accident involving its insured near Tampa, Florida in which the insured’s SUV collided with a motorcycle, Horace Mann

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Posted in Bad Faith

Will Discovery Unlock Your Claim File? Federal or State Court Jurisdiction Could Make The Difference

Differences between federal court and state court procedure can be important for insurers that find themselves involved in “bad faith” litigation.  If a lawsuit alleging extracontractual claims is filed in federal court, or if it is removable to the federal court’s jurisdiction, the parties’ discovery approach and procedural strategies could significantly change from those of a similar case that is litigated in state court. For example, discovery into the contents of an insurer’s claim file in bad faith litigation may be more restricted in federal court than in state court.  As a general suggestion to all insurers, the editors of “Avoiding Bad Faith” believe that claims representatives can improve the substance of their claim files by always assuming that everything

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Posted in Bad Faith

When is Rescission Based Upon Material Misrepresentations The Proper Course of Action?

Carriers rely on application representations regarding the existence of potential claims.  Sometimes, the carrier learns after the fact that an applicant may not have reported all known potential claims.  What can/should the carrier do?  A recent example is found in Continental Casualty v. Gargoyles, a case involving allegations of securities fraud.  Continental extended a defense under a reservation of rights, which it later sought to withdraw when the president of Gargoyles confessed to criminal wrong-doing as part of a plea agreement.  In this case, the facts confessed in the plea agreement contradicted the reported claims in the insured’s policy application.  Once the plea agreement was confirmed, Continental moved to rescind the policy and recoup its defense costs.  The court held

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Posted in Bad Faith

Avoid Inconsistent Communications By “Revolving Door” Adjusters

In CE and CLE courses, we hear all the time that the most often cited reason for a grievance or complaint is lack of communication.  This truism provides a useful rule of thumb to avoid bad faith claims.  Remember, for most claimants, the event giving rise to an insurance claim often is the most significant event which will happen to the claimant this year.  Events such as a car wreck, an injury claim, a home fire, a product disruption can wreak havoc on the insured.   And, many insureds have little idea as to how to cope with these disruptions.  At these times, when tension runs high and patience runs low, the carrier which responds promptly to communications from the claimant

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Posted in Bad Faith
Avoiding Insurance Bad Faith
Cozen O’Connor represents insurance clients in jurisdictions throughout the U.S. against statutory and common law first- and third-party extracontractual claims for actual and consequential damages, penalties, punitive and exemplary damages, attorneys’ fees and costs, and coverage payments. Whether bad faith claims are addenda to a broader coverage matter or are central to the complaint, Cozen O’Connor attorneys know how to efficiently respond to extracontractual causes of action. More
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