Monthly Archives: June 2016

The Advantages of Removal: Twombly and Iqbal Applied to Bad Faith Claims

This month, the Eastern District of Pennsylvania issued an opinion that reminds insurance carriers and their counsel that it is often beneficial to remove certain cases to federal court. While federal court offers many advantages in insurance litigation, the recent opinion in Camp v. N.J. Mfrs. Ins. Co., No. 16-1087, 2016 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 74496 (E.D. Pa. June 8, 2016) highlights one important benefit: the federal court’s role in protecting carriers from frivolous and groundless claims at an early point in the litigation. In Camp, the court considered whether to grant the insurer’s motion to dismiss when it was faced with a complaint alleging bad faith for denying the insured’s underinsured motorist (“UIM”) claim. The insurer had denied the claim

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Posted in Bad Faith

The Duty to Follow-up Part II: When The Underlying Litigation Changes

In many states, an insurer not only has a duty to timely communicate with its insured and respond to demands for settlement by a claimant asserting a claim regarding the adjustment of a loss, that duty may also include the duty to follow-up on those communications.  Recent case law further emphasizes the importance of follow-up in the context of an offer to settle made by a tort claimant, as well as when the insurer is apprised of changes to the status of claims and defenses in the underlying tort case.  Neglecting the duty to follow-up can cost an insurer – converting a $25,000 claim to a $7 million loss.  As a recent case decided by the United States District Court

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Posted in Bad Faith

Should You Withdraw The Reservation of Rights To Avoid Entry of a Consent Judgment?

An insurer that defends its insured against a third party’s lawsuit, while reserving rights to deny coverage to its insured for any judgment, may face a decision point when underlying settlement discussions become ripe to resolve the case.  In some states, the insurer must decide whether to stand on its coverage defenses, or whether to withdraw its reservation of rights with the understanding that it will pay for the settlement within its policy limits and waive those defenses while it gains control over the settlement negotiations.  These decisions are among the greatest challenges, and are often the most time-sensitive issues, that third-party liability insurers may face when invited to participate in underlying mediations. One of the key factors influencing whether

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Posted in Reservation of Rights
Avoiding Insurance Bad Faith
Cozen O’Connor represents insurance clients in jurisdictions throughout the U.S. against statutory and common law first- and third-party extracontractual claims for actual and consequential damages, penalties, punitive and exemplary damages, attorneys’ fees and costs, and coverage payments. Whether bad faith claims are addenda to a broader coverage matter or are central to the complaint, Cozen O’Connor attorneys know how to efficiently respond to extracontractual causes of action. More
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