Blog Archives

South Carolina Code Does Not Invalidate Notice and Cooperation Clauses

In late July, the South Carolina Supreme Court handed down a helpful ruling for insurers when it held that, if an insured fails to give notice to his automobile insurer of a pending claim, the insurer may deny coverage above statutory limits upon a showing that it was substantially prejudiced by its insured’s failure to comply with the standard notice clause in the policy. Neumayer v. Philadelphia Indem. Ins. Co., — S.E.2d —, 2019 S.C. LEXIS 67, at *17 (S.C. July 24, 2019). The case involved a motor vehicle accident where a pedestrian, Andrew Neumayer, was struck by a bus driver, suffering severe injuries. Neumayer filed suit against the bus driver who then failed to answer the complaint, and after

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Posted in Bad Faith

Georgia Supreme Court Spares Insurance Company from a $5.3 Million Bad-Faith Verdict

Last week, the Georgia Supreme Court confirmed that an insurance carrier’s duty to settle a claim against its policyholder arises only after an injured claimant presents a “valid offer” to settle within policy limits. In First Acceptance Insurance Company of Georgia v. Hughes,[1] the Court found that, because the letter presented to First Acceptance by the injured parties’ counsel was not a time-limited settlement demand, First Acceptance’s failure to respond before the injured parties withdrew their offer did not constitute negligence or a bad faith failure to settle the claim within policy limits. In 2008, First Acceptance’s policyholder caused a multi-car crash killing the policyholder and injuring five others, including Julie An and her 2-year-old daughter. The policy had the

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Posted in Bad Faith

Georgia Supreme Court Clarifies Pre-Suit Offer Requirements

On March 6, 2017, the Georgia Supreme Court answered certified questions regarding the application of Georgia’s Pre-Suit Offer statute concluding that O.C.G.A. § 9-11-67.1, the statute dealing with the formation of settlement agreements pursuant to pre-suit offers to settle tort claims arising from the use of a motor vehicle, does not prohibit a claimant from conditioning acceptance of a pre-suit offer upon the performance of an act, such as timely or prompt payment. Grange Mutual Casualty Co. v. Woodard, 797 S.E.2d 814 (2017). In doing so, the Court clarified that the statute sets forth the minimum requirements for pre-suit offers. Beyond those required terms, the Court explained, parties are free to add additional terms. This includes presenting a pre-suit offer

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Posted in Bad Faith, Uncategorized

Rescission: An Underutilized Tool

The rescission of an insurance policy is one of the most underutilized tools in handling insurance claims. If used properly, it unwinds the insurance transaction and the parties are restored to their position prior to the contract; it is as if the insurance contract never existed. Although rescission is primarily an equitable device, its use and scope is authorized by many state statutes. In situations where the insured has made material misrepresentations or fraudulently applied for a policy, it shields the insurer from unwarranted claims and unjust liability. There are three types of state statutes regarding rescission: (1) states that allow rescission based on material misrepresentation; (2) states that limit rescission to a knowing or reckless misrepresentation; and (3) states

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Posted in Bad Faith
Avoiding Insurance Bad Faith
Cozen O’Connor represents insurance clients in jurisdictions throughout the U.S. against statutory and common law first- and third-party extracontractual claims for actual and consequential damages, penalties, punitive and exemplary damages, attorneys’ fees and costs, and coverage payments. Whether bad faith claims are addenda to a broader coverage matter or are central to the complaint, Cozen O’Connor attorneys know how to efficiently respond to extracontractual causes of action. More
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