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Mediation Statements in Federal Courts May or May Not be Privileged and Can Be Waived

The Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Missouri declined to recognize a mediation privilege in In re Lake Lotawana Community Improvement District, 2016 WL 7984347 (Bankr. W.D. Mo. Sept. 19, 2016), despite the fact that it conceded that other circuits have done so. Lake Lotawana did not involve a mediation with a plaintiff and an insured; however, the cases presented by the parties drew heavily from the case law in the bad faith context. More specifically, in a Chapter 9 bankruptcy proceeding, the debtor must allege that it negotiated in good faith at a pre-petition mediation. In Lake Lotawana, the mediation failed and the debtor alleged as a prerequisite to filing a Chapter 9 proceeding that it had negotiated

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Alaska Creates Exception to General Rule that Injured Party Cannot Sue Insured’s Carrier

The Supreme Court of Alaska in Burnett v. Government Employees Insurance Company, 2017 WL 382648 (Alaska 2017) recently decided in a 3-2 decision that an insurer who voluntarily assumed the responsibility for cleaning up an oil spill on a third party’s property caused by its insured may become liable to that third party if it does not correctly handle the cleanup operations. GEICO argued that its obligations to its insured effectively negated any responsibility to third parties for improperly performing that clean up duty. The Court, over a strenuous dissent, rejected GEICO’s argument holding that an insurer who undertakes an independent obligation to a third party creates a new and independent duty to the third party claimant. GEICO was alleged

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Missouri Federal Court Identifies Roadblocks For An Excess Carriers’ Claim For Attorney Fees Against Primary Carrier

The court’s decision in Axis Specialty Insurance Company v. New Hampshire Insurance Company highlights the scope of recovery available for an excess carrier seeking to recover against a primary carrier. Emboldened by the recent Missouri Supreme Court decision recognizing the right of an excess carrier to sue a primary carrier for failure to reasonably settle an underlying claim in Scottsdale Ins. Co. v. Addison Ins. Co., 448 S.W.3d 818 (Mo. Banc 2014),  Axis Specialty sought to recoup not only its excess indemnity payment but also its attorney fees incurred in monitoring and eventually settling the underlying lawsuit as well as its attorney fees in pursuing its equitable subrogation and the assigned claims for bad faith and vexatious litigation.    In Scottsdale, the

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California Supreme Court Invites Suits against Defendants Doing Any Business in California

In a hotly contested 4-3 decision, the California Supreme Court in Bristol-Myers Squibb Company v. The Superior Court of San Francisco County, 2016 WL 4506107 greatly expanded the concept of specific jurisdiction to allow a non-resident plaintiff to file suit in California courts against any defendant who conducts or transacts any business in California, even though the plaintiff purchased that defendant’s product in another state.   The Court broadened the scope of specific jurisdiction to overcome the requirements of International Shoe Co. v. Washington, 326 U.S. 310 (1945), finding that a tangential use of the forum constitutes a “substantial” connection between plaintiff’s claim and the defendant’s forum activities. The product in question was Plavix, developed and manufactured by Bristol-Myers Squibb outside

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POLICY LIMIT DEMANDS + QUIRKY LEGAL ISSUES = CALL LAWYER

The recent California decision Barickman v. Mercury Casualty Company, 2016 WL 3975279, (Calif. App. – July 25, 2016), previously reported in Cozen’s bad faith blog on July 28, 2016, is worth revisiting on a bigger picture issue.  Low policy limit demands are often more dangerous than high policy demands.  This is because often times less experienced adjusters are assigned to lower policy limit cases and may not have recognized some of the red flags presented in Barickman and more importantly may not have recognized the need for legal advice.  In Barickman, those red flags were as follows:  (1) serious injuries; (2) clear liability; (3) low policy limits; (4) policy limits demand made with short time fuse to respond; (5) numerous

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Avoiding Insurance Bad Faith
Cozen O’Connor represents insurance clients in jurisdictions throughout the U.S. against statutory and common law first- and third-party extracontractual claims for actual and consequential damages, penalties, punitive and exemplary damages, attorneys’ fees and costs, and coverage payments. Whether bad faith claims are addenda to a broader coverage matter or are central to the complaint, Cozen O’Connor attorneys know how to efficiently respond to extracontractual causes of action. More
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