Blog Archives

ALLEGED BAD FAITH FAILURE TO ADVISE POLICYHOLDER OF CONSEQUENCES OF SETTLEMENT CONDUCT CAUSES INSURER TO SETTLE $22 MILLION LAWSUIT

Progressive recently settled a bad faith lawsuit with the guardians of a child injured in a car accident driven by a Progressive policyholder, Earl Lloyd. Progressive faced liability for an underlying judgment in excess of $22 million against Lloyd, who had purchased a $10,000 auto policy from Progressive. The bad faith lawsuit alleged that Progressive failed to advise its insured regarding the significance of executing a financial affidavit. Had the insured executed the financial affidavit, the claimant allegedly would have accepted the insured’s $10,000 policy limits in exchange for a release of Lloyd. The case, Wallace Mosley v. Progressive American Insurance Company, was set for trial beginning December 10, 2018 in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Bad Faith

Expanding When Liability is “Reasonably Clear”: Massachusetts Court Chips Away at Bad Faith Counterarguments

Earlier this month, a Massachusetts Appellate Court affirmed a trial court’s award of bad faith damages in a case where it found the insurer’s approach to a claim to be “at best inattentive, if not incompetent.”  Although the state appellate court in McLaughlin et al. v. American States Insurance Co. ultimately denied an award of multiple damages, its award of attorneys’ fees and costs, along with loss of use of funds damages, shows the limits of arguing no bad faith because the insured’s liability was not “reasonably clear” under Massachusetts’s bad faith statutes.  The Court’s decision, even though unpublished, serves as yet another reminder of the importance for insurers to properly investigate claims and objectively analyze whether an insured’s liability is

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Bad Faith

“Low-Ball” Settlement Offer On Its Own Is Insufficient To Support A Claim for Bad Faith Under Pennsylvania Law

A low-ball settlement offer on its own is not enough to state a claim for a bad faith according to a federal district court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania which granted the insurer’s motion to dismiss the insured’s claim for alleged violation of Pennsylvania’s bad faith insurance statute, 42 Pa.C.S. §8371. See West v. State Farm Insurance Company, 2016 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 106783 (E.D.Pa. Aug. 11, 2016). The statute provides that in an action on an insurance policy, if the court finds that the insurer acted in bad faith toward its insured, the insured may be awarded interest on the amount of the claim from the date the claim was first made by the insured, punitive damages, court costs

Tagged with: ,
Posted in Bad Faith

Insurers’ Beware: Defending Bad Faith Claim May Lead to Waiver of Privileged Communications

On July 27, 2016, the United States District Court for South Carolina ordered an insurer to turn over its privileged communications. The Court explained that the insurer waived the protections afforded under the attorney-client privilege and work product doctrine by asserting it acted in good faith in the defense of its insured. See State Farm Fire & Casualty Co., et al. v. Admiral Ins. Co., 2016 WL 4051271 (D. S.C. July 25, 2016). While this is a district court opinion and may be subject to appeal, insurers should still be cognizant of the issue. James McElveen filed suit after he was seriously injured during a fraternity hazing event hosted by Maurice Robinson and Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity. Robinson tendered the

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Bad Faith
Avoiding Insurance Bad Faith
Cozen O’Connor represents insurance clients in jurisdictions throughout the U.S. against statutory and common law first- and third-party extracontractual claims for actual and consequential damages, penalties, punitive and exemplary damages, attorneys’ fees and costs, and coverage payments. Whether bad faith claims are addenda to a broader coverage matter or are central to the complaint, Cozen O’Connor attorneys know how to efficiently respond to extracontractual causes of action. More
Cozen O’Connor Blogs