Blog Archives

Texas Federal Court Holds Rock Dust Discharged into Stream is Excluded “Pollutant,” so Insurer Owed No Duty to Defend or Indemnify, and Committed No Bad Faith

On July 10, 2018, Judge John H. McBryde of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Texas, Fort Worth Division, held an insurer owed no coverage to a New Jersey rock quarry owner for the accidental pumping of crushed rock particles into a stream. The policy’s pollution exclusion precluded coverage, regardless of whether the rocks were “wanted or useful.” Great Am. Ins. Co. v. ACE Am. Ins. Co., No. 4:18-CV-114-A, 2018 WL 3370620, at *5 (N.D. Tex. July 10, 2018). Absent coverage or any injury independent of the claim for policy benefits, the court also rejected the insured’s bad faith claim. Background Eastern Concrete Materials, Inc. operates a New Jersey rock quarry, where it crushes rock into

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Posted in Bad Faith

Illinois Appellate Court Holds Insurer Owed Coverage in Fatal Chicago Gang Shooting Lawsuit, but Insurer Did Not Commit Bad Faith in Denying Claim

On March 1, 2018, an Illinois appellate court held an insurer breached its duties to defend and indemnify a grocer after gang members shot and killed a young woman and injured another outside of the Chicago grocer. The court interpreted “liability arising out of . . . premises” language in an additional insured endorsement, broadly holding that if the basis for imposing liability arises out of the premises, the party qualifies as an insured regardless of how the injury occurs. Dominick’s Finer Foods v. Indiana Ins. Co., 2018 IL App (1st) 161864, ¶ 66. Thus, a premises defect, such as an icy sidewalk or poor lighting, was not required. However, the court refused to find the insurer committed statutory bad

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Posted in Bad Faith

Is It Bad Faith to Exercise a Contractual Right?

A recent malpractice case highlighted this issue.  In Johnson v. Proselect Insurance, the doctor/insured contended that the insurer acted in bad faith by settling a claim after trial without the doctor’s consent.  The doctor contended that the case should have been appealed, which would have reversed the adverse trial verdict.  However, the insurer’s policy stated specifically that the insurer could settle claims after trial without the doctor’s consent.  The doctor claimed, however, that the settlement caused her to suffer professional embarrassment and damaged her reputation. The Massachusetts appeals court upheld a summary judgment in the insurer’s favor.  The court noted that the settlement was explicitly permitted by the terms of the policy, and argued that the doctor’s right to consent

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PA Supreme Court Addresses Level of Proof Required Under Statutory Bad Faith Claim

In an opinion dated September 28, 2017, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, Western District, considered as an issue of first impression the level of proof required to prevail in a bad faith claim, examining the elements of a bad faith insurance claim under the PA bad faith statute, 42 Pa.C.S. Section 8371.  The lawsuit involved policy coverage issues under a cancer insurance policy issued to plaintiff as a supplement to her primary employer-based health insurance.  The Rancosky v. Washington National Insurance Company court confirmed that the two-step process, known as the Terletsky test, applied to determine whether a claimant could recover in a bad faith action.  More specifically, a plaintiff must prove by clear and convincing evidence that: (1) the insurer

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Texas Amends Insurance Code In Response To Weather Claims

On May 26, 2017, Texas Governor Greg Abbot signed into law Texas House Bill 1774/Senate Bill 10. The new law makes changes to the Texas Insurance Code that will impact the way in which weather claims are brought and how those claims may be defended. The new law becomes effective on September 1, 2017. The amendments to the Texas Insurance Code add a new Chapter 542A, which governs certain consumer actions related to claims for property damage. Specifically, Chapter 542A applies to any first-party claim which arises from “damage to or loss of covered property caused, wholly or partly, by forces of nature, including an earthquake or earth tremor, a wildfire, a flood, a tornado, lightning, a hurricane, hail, wind,

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Ninth Circuit Upholds Bad Faith Award Despite Issues With Policy Limits Demand

In Madrigal v. Allstate Indemnity Co., Cause No. 16-55830 (9th Cir. June 15, 2017), the Ninth Circuit upheld a jury award assessing $14 million in bad faith damages, even though it was unclear whether the insurer could have met the settlement demand which it allegedly refused in bad faith. The Underlying Dispute In 2009, Carlos Madrigal (“Madrigal”) was riding a motorcycle when he was hit by a car driven by Richard Tang. The accident left Madrigal a paraplegic. A police report for the accident listed Madrigal at fault for the accident. Allstate provided insurance to Richard Tang and his wife, Anna Tang, with limits of $100,000 per claimant. Madrigal, through counsel, offered to settle his claims against Richard Tang for

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West Virginia Supreme Court: Bad Faith Claims Are Premature when the Insurer Is Providing a Defense

The West Virginia Supreme Court recently granted an insurer the extraordinary legal remedy of a writ of prohibition, awarding it an immediate dismissal of the insureds’ bad faith claims. State ex rel. Universal Underwriters Insurance Company v. Wilson, ___ S.E.2d ___, 2017 WL 2415343 (W. Va. Jun. 1, 2017). The court reasoned that because the insurer is defending the insureds in the underlying tort action, the insureds have not yet suffered any recoverable item of damages as necessary to make their bad faith claims ripe for adjudication. The defendants in the underlying tort lawsuit include Salvatore Cava, Salvatore’s father, Daniel Cava, and Daniel Cava’s business, Dan’s Car World, LLC d/b/a Dan Cava’s Toyota World (“Dan’s Car World”). The insurer’s policy

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Eastern District of California Dismisses Bad Faith Action, Where Misrepresentation Voids Policy

On June 6, 2017, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of California found, consistent with longstanding California precedent, that a material misrepresentation made in the course of a coverage investigation voids coverage. The holding reaffirms the importance of the insurer’s investigation into claims it suspects may be fraudulent. The court also, again consistent with California precedent, declined to find any bad faith conduct in the absence of coverage. Young v. Progressive Casualty Insurance Co., No. 1:16-CV-01198-DWM, 2017 WL 2462497 (E.D. Cal. Jun. 6, 2017) concerned Young’s claim to Progressive for the theft of his motor home. His policy provided comprehensive coverage with an agreed value for the motorhome of $63,000 with no deductible. Law enforcement recovered the motor

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Georgia Supreme Court Clarifies Pre-Suit Offer Requirements

On March 6, 2017, the Georgia Supreme Court answered certified questions regarding the application of Georgia’s Pre-Suit Offer statute concluding that O.C.G.A. § 9-11-67.1, the statute dealing with the formation of settlement agreements pursuant to pre-suit offers to settle tort claims arising from the use of a motor vehicle, does not prohibit a claimant from conditioning acceptance of a pre-suit offer upon the performance of an act, such as timely or prompt payment. Grange Mutual Casualty Co. v. Woodard, 797 S.E.2d 814 (2017). In doing so, the Court clarified that the statute sets forth the minimum requirements for pre-suit offers. Beyond those required terms, the Court explained, parties are free to add additional terms. This includes presenting a pre-suit offer

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Posted in Bad Faith, Uncategorized

Eleventh Circuit Reaffirms There Is No Bad Faith Unless the Settlement Offer Fully Protects the Insured

Recently, the Eleventh Circuit, applying Georgia law, reaffirmed that an insurer cannot be liable for negligently failing to settle a case unless the settlement demand provides protection to the insured against all potential claims, even those which have not been asserted. Linthicum v. Mendakota Insurance Company, No. 16-16593 (11th Cir. May 3, 2017) arises from truly tragic circumstances.  While driving intoxicated, Bobby James Hopkins, II, struck and killed the Linthicums’ 11 year old son.  Hopkins fled the scene, and attempted to have his car repaired.  The child lived a short time before dying.  When the claim was reported, Mendakota Insurance Company (Insurer) noted that there was a “probable recovery” and set the reserves for the $25,000 policy limit of Hopkins’

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Avoiding Insurance Bad Faith
Cozen O’Connor represents insurance clients in jurisdictions throughout the U.S. against statutory and common law first- and third-party extracontractual claims for actual and consequential damages, penalties, punitive and exemplary damages, attorneys’ fees and costs, and coverage payments. Whether bad faith claims are addenda to a broader coverage matter or are central to the complaint, Cozen O’Connor attorneys know how to efficiently respond to extracontractual causes of action. More
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