Blog Archives

Alert! — Washington Supreme Court Limits “Insurance Fair Conduct Act”

Earlier this month, the Washington Supreme Court strictly limited Washington’s “Insurance Fair Conduct Act” (IFCA) private cause of action. Enacted in 2007, IFCA provides for uncapped triple-damages awards, and mandates attorney fee awards.  However, the statute’s enabling provisions restrict IFCA claimants to insureds whose claims for coverage or payment of benefits are unreasonably denied.  Therefore, as clarified in Perez-Cristanos v. State Farm Fire and Cas. Co., 2017 WL 448991, 2017 Wash. LEXIS 92, ___ Wn.2d ___ (2017), IFCA claims cannot proceed based only on alleged violations of claims regulations (for example, untimely insurer responses to the claimant’s communications), without a related denial of the insured’s coverage or benefits. The full Cozen O’Connor Alert! is linked here. About The Author

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Posted in Bad Faith

WHOSE SETTLEMENT IS IT, ANYWAY? NEGOTIATING CONSISTENT WITH AN INSURER’S STRONG COVERAGE DEFENSES

This author suggested, in an earlier May 2016 Bad Faith blog article, that an insurer can measure on a “strength scale” its insurance coverage defenses while it defends its insured against underlying claims and lawsuits under a reservation of rights. The “strength scale” of coverage defenses, especially when subject to ongoing updates, can become a useful decision-making tool during settlement negotiations. An insurer has a legitimate basis to assess its coverage defenses as part of the settlement process when the coverage issues may render it unclear whose money will be used to pay for a judgment or settlement: the insurer’s money, the insured’s money, or combined contributions of both. “Bad faith” case law can be scarce, in many jurisdictions, regarding

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Should You Withdraw The Reservation of Rights To Avoid Entry of a Consent Judgment?

An insurer that defends its insured against a third party’s lawsuit, while reserving rights to deny coverage to its insured for any judgment, may face a decision point when underlying settlement discussions become ripe to resolve the case.  In some states, the insurer must decide whether to stand on its coverage defenses, or whether to withdraw its reservation of rights with the understanding that it will pay for the settlement within its policy limits and waive those defenses while it gains control over the settlement negotiations.  These decisions are among the greatest challenges, and are often the most time-sensitive issues, that third-party liability insurers may face when invited to participate in underlying mediations. One of the key factors influencing whether

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Posted in Reservation of Rights

Will Discovery Unlock Your Claim File? Federal or State Court Jurisdiction Could Make The Difference

Differences between federal court and state court procedure can be important for insurers that find themselves involved in “bad faith” litigation.  If a lawsuit alleging extracontractual claims is filed in federal court, or if it is removable to the federal court’s jurisdiction, the parties’ discovery approach and procedural strategies could significantly change from those of a similar case that is litigated in state court. For example, discovery into the contents of an insurer’s claim file in bad faith litigation may be more restricted in federal court than in state court.  As a general suggestion to all insurers, the editors of “Avoiding Bad Faith” believe that claims representatives can improve the substance of their claim files by always assuming that everything

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Posted in Bad Faith
Avoiding Insurance Bad Faith
Cozen O’Connor represents insurance clients in jurisdictions throughout the U.S. against statutory and common law first- and third-party extracontractual claims for actual and consequential damages, penalties, punitive and exemplary damages, attorneys’ fees and costs, and coverage payments. Whether bad faith claims are addenda to a broader coverage matter or are central to the complaint, Cozen O’Connor attorneys know how to efficiently respond to extracontractual causes of action. More
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